Dementia Q&A

Does dementia kill you?

No.

It doesn’t kill you. Dementia is not a disease that kills you. Not like malaria will... (See below for full answer)

Is it safe to drive with dementia?

Yes.

It is safe to drive with dementia. Driving is automatic behaviour and is in the long term memory. (See below for full answer)

We’ve had over 50 questions on dementia. I’m going to run though around 15 of them. Fantastic questions.

I’ve had a discussion with the GP on our team around each of the questions.

I’m going to give a brief answer to each and I’ll go into more detail on each over the coming weeks and months.

This will hopefully provide some background into dementia and how to best support your loved ones and how to get the most out of home care.

By it’s nature dementia is an inconsistent disease, it is best to seek an in person face to face consultation with a GP who will be able to take into account your or your loved ones’ medical history.

Do the share the Q&A. If you’re watching or have any other questions about dementia or how home care or live in care could help you do leave me a comment in the live chat below…

Click on each question below to reveal the answer/discussion.


Erik - Can you please educate us about Parkinson’s disease dementia? How this might be similar and different compared to other dementias.

Parkinson’s is a long-term disorder of the central nervous system, the main difference with Parkinson’s is that it mainly affects the motor system and so people living with Parkinson’s may have difficulties with movement, walking and particularly using their hands, so chopping, preparing food and using a mobile can be difficult. It may be useful to consider a carer or family member to help support with tasks such as cooking and personal grooming.

Emmy - Is it safe to drive if you have dementia? If yes, when is it no longer safe?

Yes.

It is safe to drive with dementia. Driving is automatic behaviour and is in the long term memory.

People living with dementia mainly have problems with their short term memory and long term memory is usually less affected. Generally - problems will be with getting lost, forgetting where the car is etc.

A person living with dementia may be able to drive to the doctors for example without any problems however they may forget they are going to the doctors or become confused as to how they will get there.

Any physical disabilities will play more of an impact - sight, hearing loss, movement etc. You’ll need to make a judgement about whether it’s safe or not or you can ask your doctor to help make that judgement.

We have carers that drive and can support with maintaining independence.

Larry - Does having surgery speed up the disease; dementia.

The brain has a huge capacity it can cope with changes in environment and all sorts.

A person living with dementia though has a reduced capacity and is less able to cope with change. The most important thing is keeping things the same and consistent… the same location, same carer, same schedule if possible etc.

Now, when you have surgery you go into a different environment (hospital). The brain then has to cope with lots of different changes and distractions which can cause a temporary regression. So it’s likely that the change in environment may cause a regression rather than the surgery itself interestingly.

Perhaps think about you can lesses the transition to new environments, perhaps prepare the person in advance of any changes if possible. Talk them through the changes, when they will happen and what to expect.

Jeanette - What is the difference between dementia and Alzheimer’s?

Dementia is the term for a 100 different conditions and symptoms. One of these is Alzheimer's.

If you’ve got Alzheimer’s you’ve got Alzheimer’s disease and you’ve got Dementia. If you’ve got dementia you may have Alzheimers, or you may have vascular dementia, or lewy bodies dementia…. Or one of the other dementias.

Sian - Why does the length of decline differ if the type of dementia a person is living with is the same? 👍

It’s the nature of the disease in that it is inconsistent and affects people differently because we are genetically different. Environmental factors will also play a part too, the amount and quality of sleep, consistently of the environment and diet can all have an impact on the decline.

With consistency in mind and knowing the impact this can have on a person living with dementia, this is why we focus on having a consistent home carer in place for each family. It truly is what each family needs.

Val - Why is my Mum, who has dementia, fairly rational for a few hours and totally confused by tea time?

Again, It’s the nature of the disease. It’s inconsistent. But it can also be affected by the environment. Consistency of the environment, sleep, diet, schedule can all play apart in causing confusion.

Why does it hurt us so much?

It can seem as if you’re losing the person. With some dementias, particularly Alzheimer’s the person’s personality can change. The physical person is still there but their personality may change. The closer you are to that person the more its going to hurt. It’s perhaps best to remember than dementia is a small part of the person and to remember all of the other things and years that make up that person.

Barbara - Why are childhood memories so vivid for people living with dementia, when they can't remember what happened this morning?

If you look back through the posts you’ll come across the Alzheimer’s Society’s Bookcase Analogy. This brilliantly explains why people living with dementia can recall vividly memories from a long time ago but struggle to remember what they had for breakfast or what they did yesterday.

Click here to view the written post and video.

Peter - What qualifications do you have that are sufficient to be able to provide accurate and credible information? What are your motivations behind doing these posts? Is it just to advertise your own business perhaps?

Yes, we have a business. But we want to provide genuine value and education to people. If they then want to work with us that’s cool and if they don’t that’s cool too!

I (Christopher) am an Alzheimer's Society Dementia Friends Champion, I volunteer for the Alzheimers’s Society as a trainer. I’ve been working with people with dementia for over 2 years. On my team I have a GP with over 30 years’ experience working in the NHS who I’ve conferred with in order to accurately answer these questions.

Leslie - Why is no one talking about nutrition? It angers me knowing that my dad’s condition could have been slowed down. Once we eliminated sugar, dairy & gluten & added way more fruits and vegetables, his memory came back, his aggression went away, and he came off sedative meds which all lead to a MUCH greater quality of life. I’ve been researching dementia for years and happy to share everything we’ve learned.

Diet is another environmental variable. I said that environmental factors can affect dementia and it’s rate of progress. Diet and nutrition is one of those variables that will help to improve wellbeing… Interesting you talk about the sedative meds… you’ll probably find the drug companies would probably prefer you didn’t know about cutting out sugar, dairy and gluten!

Lynn - Why or how do younger people develop early onset dementia ? My mother died last year at the age of 62 yrs old. She was diagnosed 5 years prior. We had such a short time to get our heads around it. 😔

It’s a myth that dementia only occurs in older people. Young people can get dementia.

There’s a charity called Young Dementia, do check that out. We don’t know for sure what causes it yet or why we get it. There’s a lot of research being done into tablets, knocks on the head and there’s also research going on about heading a football and boxing…

Paula - How/why does dementia kill people?

It doesn’t kill you. Dementia is not a disease that kills you. Not like malaria will. It may make you more susceptible to other illnesses like pneumonia though which then might kill you. But dementia doesn’t kill you as such.

Marion - Why do people tell me I don't look like or speak like I have Dementia?

Brilliant question.

Dementia a physical disease of the brain.

But It’s not an external physical disease or injury like a broken arm or leg or bleeding. The brain is an internal organ, we can't see it. In that sense dementia is invisible.

Brandy - Sorry theres a few that come to mind. How do you cope with your loved ones dementia?

With support, understanding the disease and with consistency - a stabilised environment. The same consistent carer each day, a regular and consistent schedule, a regular diet.

Also A safe environment, removing rugs and having well fitted shoes are good quick wins.

How do you help someone who knows they have dementia, and gets frustrated that they cant remember?

Don’t show them they’re wrong, don’t correct their mistakes, don’t argue with them. Play along each time. Otherwise it agitates them and can make things worse.

We encourage out home carers and our live in carers to be firm, empathic, understanding and reassuring. It's important to get the right balance - being firm, understanding and reasurring but not too much that it creates a dependence.

Why do you see it progress faster in some and not in others?

See above answers, it’s about a person’s genetics and their environment and other factors. It’s the nature of the disease in that it is inconsistent and affects people differently because we are genetically different. Environmental factors will play a part too, amount of sleep, consistently of environment etc.

Guillaume - Does a dementia scale exist?

Yes. It progresses at different rates depending on the things we’ve discussed and also which dementia it is. Alzheimer’s is progressive at the same steady rate whilst vascular dementia is more step like in it’s progression. With vascular dementia a person can be at the same level of health and wellbeing for a long time and then there may be a sudden decline.

Kristina - When do you start seeing the first symptoms, what age? What are the first symptoms?

It’s a myth that dementia is just in older people. Young people get dementia, as I said above there is a charity called Young Dementia. It’s more rare though. Quite often the first symptoms will be confusion or a loss of short term memory not long term memory.

I’m also going to go into each question in more dept over the coming months… so stay tuned for that. 

If you liked the Q&A so share it via email or social media, leave me a comment in the live chat below. Did you find out anything new, let me know in the live chat or on the video on social media.

If you know someone who needs some support let them or their family members know about me and about CareChooser and I’ll see you soon. 

Christopher “Picks Star Carers” Downie

P.S. Whenever you’re ready... here are 5 ways I can help improve the wellbeing of your elderly parents/spouse:
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
1. Grab a free copy of my e-book; 3 quick tips to beat falls and confusion. It’s a road map to wellbeing - a 20 second read... We asked the GP on our team; Malcolm for his 3 top tips. — Click Here (https://www.carechooser.com#homecare-falls) Look for the gold banner.

2. Join CareChooser’s Facebook page and connect with us. It’s our new Facebook community where you can follow and learn from us. — Click Here (https://www.facebook.com/CareChooser)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
3. If you’d like us to improve the wellbeing of your parents/spouse and have us find you a consistent carer send me a message at bit.ly/christopherdownie with the words “Carer”. Tell me a little about your parents/spouse, we’ll check availability in your area, send profiles and arrange a meeting.

4. Join us and be a Case Study I’m putting together a new case study at CareChooser... stay tuned for details. If you’d like to work with me on improving the wellbeing of your parents/spouse and learn the secrets to getting the most from a carer... just send me a message atbit.ly/christopherdownie with the words “Case Study”.

5. Work with me and my team privately.
If you’d like to work directly with me and my team to take you from stressed to wellbeing and have us find a bespoke carer matched uniquely for your family just send me a message at bit.ly/christopherdownie with the word “Private”... tell me a little about your parents/spouse and what you’d like to work on together, and I’ll get you all the details!


Previous posts:


How vascular dementia is like roads, traffic 🚗🚙🚕🚛 & cars?

Today I’m going to talk about vascular dementia and how it is like traffic, roads and cars! 

In my last post and video I talked about Alzheimer’s disease and how it is caused. 

Vascular dementia - Private home care & live in care.jpg

We know plaque builds up around teeth and causes decay and with Alzheimer’s plaque builds up around the brain cells and also tangles are formed inside brain cells. 


Christie commented on yesterday’s video and asked me to talk a little about vascular dementia, another common dementia. 

I’m going to talk briefly about how vascular dementia is caused… 

Vascular dementia is a different dementia to Alzheimer’s and so has different causes and different symptoms.  

The best way to think about vascular dementia is to think of car roads, cars and traffic. 

Roads often become blocked, nothing can pass and this causes a reduced flow of the traffic and cars. 

The same happens with vascular dementia, small blood vessels inside the brain narrow and become blocked which causes a reduced flow of blood to the brain, this can damage and kill brain cells. 

On a road crashes can cause blockages in the road and a reduced flow of traffic. Again it’s the same with vascular dementia… a stroke or a mini stroke is like a crash… it causes damage to the blood supply and reduces or stops the flow of blood to the brain. 

I know this sounds bad, it sounds terrible, but it is possible to live well with dementia. With understanding, positivity and support from family members or from home carers or live in carers people can live very well with dementia and with vascular dementia.

Who do you know that may benefit from being connected to me? Let them know about this post and the video and about CareChooser.

I shall see you next time… next week I’m going to be doing an question and answer session. A Q&A… drop me a question about dementia, a different condition… diabetes, arthritis, about home care or carers or a question to do with supporting a loved one and I’ll answer it on the next live… Have a think, leave me a question, either on Facebook or pop a question below in the live chat and look out for next week’s video and post.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Recap of the key messages from the previous posts & videos:

Alzheimer’s disease is caused by the build up of proteins or plaque (amyloid) around the brain cells and (tau) tangles inside brain cells.

Dementia DOESN’T affect the part of the brain (amygdala) that controls EMOTIONS and FEELINGS as much as factual information.

Dementia is not just about losing your memory (it effects other functions too… )

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Christopher “Picks Star Carers” Downie

P.S. Whenever you’re ready... here are 5 ways I can help improve the wellbeing of your elderly parents/spouse:
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
1. Grab a free copy of my e-book; 3 quick tips to beat falls and confusion. It’s a road map to wellbeing - a 20 second read... We asked the GP on our team; Malcolm for his 3 top tips. — Click Here (https://www.carechooser.com#homecare-falls) Look for the gold banner.

2. Join CareChooser’s Facebook page and connect with us. It’s our new Facebook community where you can follow and learn from us. — Click Here (https://www.facebook.com/CareChooser)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
3. If you’d like us to improve the wellbeing of your parents/spouse and have us find you a consistent carer send me a message at bit.ly/christopherdownie with the words “Carer”. Tell me a little about your parents/spouse, we’ll check availability in your area, send profiles and arrange a meeting.

4. Join us and be a Case Study I’m putting together a new case study at CareChooser... stay tuned for details. If you’d like to work with me on improving the wellbeing of your parents/spouse and learn the secrets to getting the most from a carer... just send me a message atbit.ly/christopherdownie with the words “Case Study”.

5. Work with me and my team privately.
If you’d like to work directly with me and my team to take you from stressed to wellbeing and have us find a bespoke carer matched uniquely for your family just send me a message at bit.ly/christopherdownie with the word “Private”... tell me a little about your parents/spouse and what you’d like to work on together, and I’ll get you all the details!


Previous posts:

  • Home Care Guide - Conditions - Episode 1 - Multiple Sclerosis

  • Home Care Guide - Conditions - Episode 2 - Dementia

  • Home Care Guide - Conditions - Episode 3 - Diabetes

  • Home Care Guide - Conditions - Episode 4 - Alzheimer's

  • Home Care Guide - Conditions - Episode 5 - Vascular Dementia

  • Home Care Guide - Conditions - Episode 6 - Parkinson's

  • How Alzheimer’s is caused - Alzheimer’s disease

  • Dementia DOESN’T affect the part of the brain controls EMOTIONS and FEELINGS as much as factual information. - Dementia

  • Dementia is not just about losing your memory - Dementia


What do Alzheimer's disease and teeth have in common?

Alzheimer's disease - private home care & live in care | CareChooser 2018.jpg

We know what causes TOOTH 😬 problems right?

PLAQUE.

And Alzheimers’s disease? 🧠 (the most common dementia)

That’s plaque too.

Plaque and tangles.

*NOTE… different forms of dementia have different causes (Vascular dementia is caused by reduced flow of blood to the brain)

So today…

A minute ⏰ talking about how Alzheimer’s affects the brain, what actually happens…

In the brain of someone living with Alzheimer’s, there are 2 different proteins that build up called amyloid and tau.

There is a build up of amyloid which is a plaque. This plaque builds up around brain 🧠cells.

The protein tau forms tangles inside the brain cells.

Researches 👩‍⚕️ still don’t fully understand themselves how these plaques and tangles cause the loss of brain cells. But there is a decrease is the brain’s chemical messengers that sends signals between brain cells.

I’ve had lots of people asking if they can share the videos and posts… Do share - click on my name, view my profile and you’ll be able to share…

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Recap of the key messages from the previous posts & videos:

Dementia is not just about losing your memory (it effects other functions too… )

Dementia DOESN’T affect the part of the brain (amygdala) that controls EMOTIONS and FEELINGS as much as factual information.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Christopher “Picks Star Carers” Downie

P.S. Whenever you’re ready... here are 5 ways I can help improve the wellbeing of your elderly parents/spouse:
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
1. Grab a free copy of my e-book; 3 quick tips to beat falls and confusion. It’s a road map to wellbeing - a 20 second read... We asked the GP on our team; Malcolm for his 3 top tips. — Click Here (https://www.carechooser.com#homecare-falls) Look for the gold banner.

2. Join CareChooser’s Facebook page and connect with us. It’s our new Facebook community where you can follow and learn from us. — Click Here (https://www.facebook.com/CareChooser)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
3. If you’d like us to improve the wellbeing of your parents/spouse and have us find you a consistent carer send me a message at bit.ly/christopherdownie with the words “Carer”. Tell me a little about your parents/spouse, we’ll check availability in your area, send profiles and arrange a meeting.

4. Join us and be a Case Study I’m putting together a new case study at CareChooser... stay tuned for details. If you’d like to work with me on improving the wellbeing of your parents/spouse and learn the secrets to getting the most from a carer... just send me a message atbit.ly/christopherdownie with the words “Case Study”.

5. Work with me and my team privately.
If you’d like to work directly with me and my team to take you from stressed to wellbeing and have us find a bespoke carer matched uniquely for your family just send me a message at bit.ly/christopherdownie with the word “Private”... tell me a little about your parents/spouse and what you’d like to work on together, and I’ll get you all the details!


CareChooser Home Care - Alzheimer's Society.png
Dementia_Friends_RGB_land.jpg

We are a dementia friendly organisation and we deliver the Alzheimer's Society's free 45 minute-1hour long Dementia Friends information session. This session takes a very positive view of dealing with dementia. One of it's key 5 messages is that it is possible to live well with dementia. We also strongly align to one of the key elements of the campaign to change the way people talk about dementia and changing from the use of the term 'dementia sufferer' to 'person living with dementia'. We regularly deliver the free Dementia Friends session and can also deliver it 1:1 to family members or to whole family groups. 


Previous conditions covered:


Hippocampus & Amygdala...

Dementia - Private Home Care & Live In Care | CareChooser 2018.jpg

A quick... short post about the hippocampus and the amygdala (parts of the brain).

The hippocampus controls dates, names and facts.

It's easily affected by dementia.

But... the amygdala  controls emotions and feelings and is far more resistant to dementia. 💪

Heard from SO MANY people this week since my posts and videos last week who have seen this with their family members.

A loss of factual information but not of feelings.

If you know someone who may need a carer let them know about me and about CareChooser


Christopher “Picks Star Carers” Downie

P.S. Whenever you’re ready... here are 5 ways I can help improve the wellbeing of your elderly parents/spouse:
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
1. Grab a free copy of my e-book; 3 quick tips to beat falls and confusion. It’s a road map to wellbeing - a 20 second read... We asked the GP on our team; Malcolm for his 3 top tips. — Click Here (https://www.carechooser.com#homecare-falls) Look for the gold banner.

2. Join CareChooser’s Facebook page and connect with us. It’s our new Facebook community where you can follow and learn from us. — Click Here (https://www.facebook.com/CareChooser)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
3. If you’d like us to improve the wellbeing of your parents/spouse and have us find you a consistent carer send me a message on WhatsApp at bit.ly/carechooser-WA with the words “Carer”. Tell me a little about your parents/spouse, we’ll check availability in your area, send profiles and arrange a meeting. 

4. Join us and be a Case Study I’m putting together a new case study at CareChooser... stay tuned for details. If you’d like to work with me on improving the wellbeing of your parents/spouse and learn the secrets to getting the most from a carer... just send me a message on WhatsApp at bit.ly/carechooser-WA with the words “Case Study”.

5. Work with me and my team privately.
If you’d like to work directly with me and my team to take you from stressed to wellbeing and have us find a bespoke carer matched uniquely for your family just send me a message on WhatsApp at bit.ly/carechooser-WA with the word “Private”... tell me a little about your parents/spouse and what you’d like to work on together, and I’ll get you all the details!

Our carers provide you with specialised dementia care at home. Your loved ones will be looked after by carers with experience working and supporting people living with dementia and know how to adapt to the condition's changing nature.

Contact us on 0208 886 0686 if we can help in anyway. 


CareChooser Home Care - Alzheimer's Society.png
Dementia_Friends_RGB_land.jpg

We are a dementia friendly organisation and we deliver the Alzheimer's Society's free 45 minute-1hour long Dementia Friends information session. This session takes a very positive view of dealing with dementia. One of it's key 5 messages is that it is possible to live well with dementia. We also strongly align to one of the key elements of the campaign to change the way people talk about dementia and changing from the use of the term 'dementia sufferer' to 'person living with dementia'. We regularly deliver the free Dementia Friends session and can also deliver it 1:1 to family members or to whole family groups. 


Previous conditions covered:


Did you know this about dementia?

Dementia - Private Home Care & Live In Care | CareChooser 2018.jpg

Imagine the brain as bookshelves… 📔📕📗

Now fast forward 44 years, I am 80 years old (today!!) How does dementia effect me? 

There is a full bookcase, each book represents a memory or a fact. 

My top shelf holds very recent books or memories, such as what I had for breakfast this morning, how much food I gave the chickens… 

By my shoulders are my 60s, such as my retirement party. 🎉

By my knees are books from my 20s & by my feet books holding memories from childhood; school memories. 

Dementia rocks the bookcase from side to side. 

What will happen to the books? 

They will fall off. Starting from where? The top. 

As dementia progresses, my upper shelves will empty, so what I think as my most recent memories will come from further down my bookcase - earlier in my life. 

If only books and memories that are still firm are from a lower shelf, when I was in my 20s I may think I’m living in the 1950s. This could cause some problems. I may put the electric kettle on the hob. 

You my family member and friends may get me a hob kettle to help and support me.

Hearing this… 👆 you may think a person with dementia loses everything. 

But…

I’ve only shared 1 part of the brain. The factual bookcase, (the hippocampus part of the brain) which holds facts, names, faces, numbers, dates.

This bookcase is flimsy, bought from Ikea and poorly constructed… (must do better next time!) 

There is another part of the brain - picture as a separate bookcase, the emotional bookcase (The amygdala part of the brain).

This manages my emotions and feelings. 

But… 

This bookcase is rock solid and made of oak and so It’s more resistant to dementia and its contents will be safer for longer. 

For every book on the factual bookcase there is a corresponding book on my emotional bookcase. A school book or memory in the factual part of the brain & in the emotional part; a feeling, perhaps of being inspired by a teacher. 

You come to visit me & we have a row because I forgot your name. I may feel angry and upset, you think it doesn’t matter because I will forget about it.

Your right, I may forget the argument but the feelings of anger and sadness will stay. 

A different day, we go to the beach 🏖and have ice cream. 

Later, I forget the ice cream 🍦and may even forget the whole day out. You may think that the trip wasn’t worth while but what stays with me? 

The happy emotions and feelings. The happiness of the trip, the excitement & contentment of the ice cream. 🍦

This is why we encourage anyone who knows someone living with dementia to continue to visit them and help them to live well because they will remember the feelings of love and happiness. 

Remember - you can live well with dementia. This analogy is from the Alzheimer’s Society Dementia Friends information session that I deliver.

I’ll be doing another live shortly so keep an eye out, if you like this message share it out & leave me a comment.

If you know someone who may need a carer let them know about me and about CareChooser.

Christopher “Picks Star Carers” Downie

P.S. Whenever you’re ready... here are 5 ways I can help improve the wellbeing of your elderly parents/spouse:
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
1. Grab a free copy of my e-book; 3 quick tips to beat falls and confusion. It’s a road map to wellbeing - a 20 second read... We asked the GP on our team; Malcolm for his 3 top tips. — Click Here (https://www.carechooser.com#homecare-falls) Look for the gold banner.

2. Join CareChooser’s Facebook page and connect with us. It’s our new Facebook community where you can follow and learn from us. — Click Here (https://www.facebook.com/CareChooser)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
3. If you’d like us to improve the wellbeing of your parents/spouse and have us find you a consistent carer send me a message on WhatsApp at bit.ly/carechooser-WA with the words “Carer”. Tell me a little about your parents/spouse, we’ll check availability in your area, send profiles and arrange a meeting. 

4. Join us and be a Case Study I’m putting together a new case study at CareChooser... stay tuned for details. If you’d like to work with me on improving the wellbeing of your parents/spouse and learn the secrets to getting the most from a carer... just send me a message on WhatsApp at bit.ly/carechooser-WA with the words “Case Study”.

5. Work with me and my team privately.
If you’d like to work directly with me and my team to take you from stressed to wellbeing and have us find a bespoke carer matched uniquely for your family just send me a message on WhatsApp at bit.ly/carechooser-WA with the word “Private”... tell me a little about your parents/spouse and what you’d like to work on together, and I’ll get you all the details!

Our carers provide you with specialised dementia care at home. Your loved ones will be looked after by carers with experience working and supporting people living with dementia and know how to adapt to the condition's changing nature.

Contact us on 0208 886 0686 if we can help in anyway. 


CareChooser Home Care - Alzheimer's Society.png
Dementia_Friends_RGB_land.jpg

We are a dementia friendly organisation and we deliver the Alzheimer's Society's free 45 minute-1hour long Dementia Friends information session. This session takes a very positive view of dealing with dementia. One of it's key 5 messages is that it is possible to live well with dementia. We also strongly align to one of the key elements of the campaign to change the way people talk about dementia and changing from the use of the term 'dementia sufferer' to 'person living with dementia'. We regularly deliver the free Dementia Friends session and can also deliver it 1:1 to family members or to whole family groups. 


Previous conditions covered:


Dementia Is Not Just About Memory

Private home care & live in care | CareChooser home care 2018.jpg

Imagine the brain is a string of fairy lights...

When a person has dementia, some of the fairy lights may flicker or dim.

Why? Because dementia is a physical disease of the brain.

Depending on which light flickers or dims (which nerve cells in the brain are affected by the build up of plaque)...

That will determine which bodily function is affected by dementia.

Remember. It’s not just about memory.

If the part of the brain 🧠 that controls vision 👀 is affected, then the person’s vision will be affected.

If the communication between the nerve cells that control movement are affected... movement will become difficult.

Here’s yesterday’s video on dementia and fairy lights. 

Our carers provide you with specialised dementia care at home. Your loved ones will be looked after by carers with experience working and supporting people living with dementia and know how to adapt to the condition's changing nature.

Contact us on 0208 886 0686 if we can help in anyway. 


CareChooser Home Care - Alzheimer's Society.png
Dementia_Friends_RGB_land.jpg

We are a dementia friendly organisation and we deliver the Alzheimer's Society's free 45 minute-1hour long Dementia Friends information session. This session takes a very positive view of dealing with dementia. One of it's key 5 messages is that it is possible to live well with dementia. We also strongly align to one of the key elements of the campaign to change the way people talk about dementia and changing from the use of the term 'dementia sufferer' to 'person living with dementia'. We regularly deliver the free Dementia Friends session and can also deliver it 1:1 to family members or to whole family groups. 


Previous conditions covered:


How do you talk to parents about care at home?

Talking to parents about needing care at home can be a very difficult subject to broach. You're not alone. We've heard from lots of people who are at this stage.

You’re not alone. 75% of adults haven’t had discussions about planning for the future with parents (Merrill Lynch study). Perhaps you know you need some support, but don't quite know how to go about the conversation. 

Most calls come from the children of loved ones needing care, it's rare for the person needing care to seek care themselves and It's common for them to claim they don't need care. 

Where do you turn for support? Where can you find advice? Where are the tips? 


First let's consider why parents or grandparents may be reluctant to have care at home.

1. They may still view you as the child. Because of the parent/child relationship, they are uncomfortable with you telling them or advising them what to do.

2. They may be worried that they will become a burden.

3. They may think that the support will cost too much and that this will have an impact on how much they are able to leave for their family.

4. They may see receiving care and support as a loss of their control and independence.

5. They me worried about getting older and the obstacles which come with ageing. 


So how to prepare for a conversation about care and support?

1. Prepare - Plan the conversation - Which Magazine recommends, for an increased chance of a positive response, considering what you’re going to say, how you’re going to say it and when the best time for the chat will be.

Do some research on solutions, support and advice and the funding available (see our free guide).

Choose a place and time where distractions will be at a minimum. 

2. The conversation - Reassure - There may be feelings such as anxiety, fear of losing independence, dignity and also feelings of reluctance about home care. Be empathic and understanding; acknowledge what the person is saying and listen. 

3. How to start? - Metlife in the US recommends using open-ended questions that will enable a discussion rather than closed questions which can be answered ‘yes’ or ‘no’ and will result in a short unsuccessful conversation. Which magazine has some useful sentence/conversation starters… 

'Is there anything that is worrying you or that you are having difficulty with?'

'I would like to talk about .... so that we can work out if there’s anything we can do to make your life easier/more comfortable.'

'I would like to make sure that you are happy with ... If not, there might be things that we can do together to help.'

4. Support for yourself - Is there someone who can be with you and support you during the conversation. Could a professional such as a GP, social worker or other professional support you in a second conversation? Could you arrange a Local Authority care needs assessment which is free of any cost? We are here for support and to listen, maybe you'd like to call. 

5. Take time - Don't expect your loved one to accept or be co-operative in a conversation the 1st time. Maybe it's not the correct time yet? Give them time, show them and demonstrate you want the best for them. 

6. Start with a 2 week trial - Maybe suggest a slow or soft start to the care and support and build up. 


We asked Malcolm, our experienced GP and part of the CareChooser team for his thoughts on how to get the care started if your loved ones aren't keen or reject the idea.

Malcolm recommends having a carer visit for a chat alone or with the family waiting in a different room to give them time and space to get used to the idea and to meet the person and chat without any pressure. He also recommends building up the support starting with small amounts of time to build confidence and a strong relationship. 

Perhaps you'd like to have a further chat or would like some help and support with any specific issues you are having. Our advisors are on 0208 886 0686 or you could request a call back with the form on the right. 

 

Re-published and updated. Originally published in February 7th 2017.

Home Care Questions - Other Episodes:




CareChooser Home Care Guide - OnToplist.com

Home Care - Which fall alarm should I buy?

Home Care Questions - Other Episodes:

Length - Short (2 mins) 

Call centre fall alarms

When triggered by an elderly relative, call centre fall alarms will automatically dial into the call centre who will deal with the fall.

Check their process and how it is they will deal with a fall.

These will usually be paid monthly subscriptions to the access the service plus an initial one off cost. 

Here's a short list of options for fall alarms (we're not paid or sponsored by these links) 

Age UK - £69 one-off payment. £45 quarterly. 

Saga - No start up cost and £19.14 monthly.

Indeme - 50% off 1st 3 months at £8.40per month and then £16.80 monthly.

SureSafe - £14.99 per month with 1st month free. 

 

📞 0208 886 0686 

Dementia

Our carers provide you with specialised dementia care at home. Your loved ones will be looked after by carers with experience working and supporting people living with dementia and know how to adapt to the condition's changing nature. Read our short dementia guide below and contact us on 0208 886 0686 if we can help in anyway. 


CareChooser Home Care - Alzheimer's Society.png
Dementia_Friends_RGB_land.jpg

We are a dementia friendly organisation and we deliver the Alzheimer's Society's free 45 minute-1hour long Dementia Friends information session. This session takes a very positive view of dealing with dementia. One of it's key 5 messages is that it is possible to live well with dementia. We also strongly align to one of the key elements of the campaign to change the way people talk about dementia and changing from the use of the term 'dementia sufferer' to 'person living with dementia'. We regularly deliver the free Dementia Friends session and can also deliver it 1:1 to family members or to whole family groups. 


Previous conditions covered:

 

Outline

Dementia is a confusing term, it's often confused with Alzheimer's disease and other diseases. Dementia is an umbrella term that describes a set of different symptoms. It is caused when the brain is physically damaged by diseases such as Alzheimer's disease or Vascular dementia. Dementia is caused by diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Alzheimer's is a dementia. 

Symptoms

  • There are many different diseases that can result in dementia such as Alzheimer’s disease, Vascular dementia, Mixed dementia, Dementia with Lewy bodies, Fronto-temporal dementia (including Pick’s disease). There are also many other rarer diseases which cause dementia and make up around 5% of all dementias, these include corticobasal degeneration, progressive supranuclear palsy, HIV infection, Niemann-Pick disease type C, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), Parkinson's disease and Huntingdon's disease.

There are lots of symptoms relating to dementia, the Alzheimer's Society has a fantastic analogy to help understand the different symptoms of dementia and how they affect the functions of the body, not just memory loss. 

Imagine the brain is a series of fairy lights. Dementia can cause some of these fairy lights in the brain to start to flicker, dim and then eventually to go out. Depending on which fairy light starts to flicker, or which part of the brain is affected by dementia will then affect which bodily function will start to become affected. 

Some of the symptoms of dementia are changes in mood. This can mean a person living with dementia can become frustrated, anxious, upset, sad or angry. A person living with dementia will have cognitive difficulties, such as difficulties with memory and thinking. Their ability to remember and recall things that happened more recently and remembering the day, the date or where they are will become difficult. People living with dementia may find it easier to recall events that happened further into the past than more recent ones.

Making decisions and carrying out a series of tasks such as making a cup of tea or cooking a meal may also become difficult. It may be more tricky to follow conversations or to follow and understand what is said on TV. Dementia can also affect vision which can cause problems with seeing objects or judging distances. 

Other symptoms could include hallucinations, delusions or physical symptoms such as weakness, weight loss and changes in appetite or sleep. 

Dementia is progressive which means it will gradually get worse, this will happen at different rates depending which disease has caused the dementia. Alzheimer's is usually more gradual, whilst Vascular dementia has a more step-like progression.

Care

There is currently a lot research being done into dementia but at this time, most of its causes cannot be cured. There are lots of support, activities and therapies that can help a person living with dementia to live well. 

Lots of products exist that can assist in daily life such as anti-spill mugs, user-friendly utensils, talking or written word clocks, pill boxes and user-friendly phones. There are also new technologies incorporating the internet of things which monitor the use and also non-use of doors and electrical appliances. 

Many forms of cognitive therapies exist also that can aid a person's mind and keep them independent and living well. Local services and activities that provide singing and meet-ups providing enjoyment, stimulation and social interaction are often hugely valuable and worth looking into also. 



 

Previous conditions covered:

Home Care - What Should I Consider? Part 2

We published a short guide to what to consider if you're thinking about home care which can be viewed here:  Home Care - What should I consider?  We're following it up with a look into the possible answers to the questions. 

Other Episodes:

What type of support do I need? What do I need help with in order to support my loved one? 

Think about yourself. Think about what support you need in order to better support your loved one. Would that be the practical tasks and errands like shopping? A regular visit to ensure peace of mind? 

What type of medical or health condition do they have?

Many people that require support have a health condition. We've produced short videos and a quick guide on some of the conditions here. If you suspect that you're loved one may be living with or developing a condition, we can support you and listen to your concerns. Visiting a GP may help to confirm a diagnosis. 

What types of things can they remain independent with and do by themselves?

We like to be very positive in our approach. Whilst thinking about what you and your loved one may need support with may be helpful. It may also be helpful to think about what you would like or are able to continue doing and what your loved one is able to do independently.

Often the things people need support with first are tasks that require extra flexibility or accuracy; daily living activities such as chopping when preparing food, brushing hair or getting dressed. 

What types of things will they need support with? Emotional support, physical support, what other tasks might they need help with? 

Our team and our carers can offer a good level of emotional support for you or for your loved one; someone to talk to, someone who will just LISTEN. Companionship and a consistent friendly face to check in with regularly or a companion to support independent living and a continuation of much loved activities and hobbies!

Physical support could include helping to get out of bed in the morning. Support with mobility and moving around inside the house or getting around the local community. Many of our experienced carers have qualifications and experience using equipment such as hoists. 

Will they need some level of personal care? 

Personal care could include support to get dressed in the morning, personal grooming tasks such as brushing of hair, washing or support with toileting. Personal care support may be required infrequently, a few hours each morning, a few times a day or more regular support. 

How much care will my loved one need? Think about how long each task would take.

How long would it take to do the housekeeping chores? Think about the areas that need attention and the size of the property. (Our carers may take a fraction longer to ensure that tasks are not rushed or of poor quality and to ensure there is a bit of time for a chat!) 

How much will the care cost? What is my budget? Will I qualify for a direct payment?

Live in care costs £787 per week which is the total cost including our fee. Hourly care is £16.97 per hour. 

You can receive direct payments to help pay for the cost of care if you have less than £23,250 in savings. For home care this amount does not include the value of your property. If your loved one is going into a care home this amount includes the value of your property.

To arrange a needs assessment and a financial assessment you must contact your local authority, let us know if you need help with that. 

Are there specific things that they may need in a carer? Are there necessary qualifications, certificates or training that need to be considered to meet the need? What skills will the carer need? What would make a good match? 

Consider the sex of the carer. Skills such as driving and cooking. Any matching interests or hobbies? 

Will we need to prepare our loved one for the care in any way? 

It's can help with the success of the care if you're loved one is prepared. Involve them in family decisions and talk to them in advance of the care starting. Invite them to be involved in the process of choosing the correct carer. Think about any adaptations that may need to be made for example adding a key lock for entry, preparing a spare room for a live in care to make them feel welcome. 

If you need any help answering any of the questions, we are more than happy to offer help and support in any way we can, we can also visit to carry out a consultation to listen to your ideas, concerns and expectations. Give our team a call on 0208 886 0686. 

My Support Network is how we support you. We're here to support you, we're always at the end of the phone (if we don't answer immediately it's because we're helping another client) or we can make a short trip to visit you in person. 

Call us on 0208 886 0686

Or request a callback:

 

Parkinson's

Our carers have experience working and supporting people living with Parkinson's disease at home. Our home carers have the expertise to adapt to the condition's changing nature. Read our short Parkinson's guide below and look out for the section at the bottom about how to adapt your home for Parkinson's and do contact us on 0208 886 0686 if we can help in anyway. 


 

Outline

Parkinson's disease is condition that physically affects and damages the brain. It is a progressive disease, which means it will gradually get worse over time.

Parkinson's is a rarer form of dementia, It is caused when nerve cells are lost in the substantia nigra area of the brain, this is towards the lower middle of the brain. 

People living with Parkinson's don't have enough of the chemical dopamine because the cells that are lost produce it. 

Dopamine is the chemical that enables messages to be sent to the parts of the brain that manage movement. 

Around 1 in 500 people are estimated to be affected by Parkinson's. 

Symptoms

  • There are many different symptoms related to Parkinson's disease. The main symptoms are shaking of parts of the body, known as tremors as well as having stiff muscles and a reduced speed of movement.

Other Physical symptoms related to Parkinson's disease include: Pain

  • Bladder and bowel problems

  • Muscle cramps

  • Foot problems

  • Skin problems

  • Sweating

  • Eye problems

  • Low blood pressure

  • Sleep difficulties

  • Dizziness

  • Fatigue/tiredness

  • Falls

  • Speech and communication difficulties

  • Dental problems

  • Eating and swallowing

  • Control of saliva

  • loss of smell

Other symptoms include:

  • Depression

  • Hallucinations

  • Delusions

  • Anxiety

  • Memory difficulties

  • Difficulties with thinking

 

Care

There isn't currently a cure for Parkinson's disease. There are however treatments and therapies available which can help with the symptoms and help a person living with Parkinson's to live well which include:

  • Physiotherapy

  • Dietary therapy

  • Speech and Language therapy

  • Occupational therapy

  • Medication

There are alternative therapies that people with Parkinson's use such as art therapy, acupuncture and many others.

You should take medical advice from your GP before beginning any therapies, medications or alternative therapies. Below is a short guide on how to adapt to your home to live well with Parkinson's. 



How to Adapt Your Home For Parkinson's 

When seeking to adapt your home for living with Parkinson's or in preparation for the onset of Parkinson's a good step is a visit from an Occupational Therapist who can provide expert advice about modifications to the home and equipment. Occupational Therapist visits are free of charge via the NHS.

The Parkinson's Disease Foundation and AgingCare.com recommend the following adjustments, modifications and equipment when caring for those living with Parkinson's. 

General

  • - Kitchen, bathroom, bedroom and stairs are main areas of concern

  • - Arrange furniture to allow space for comfortable standing, sitting and turning

  • - Handrails on both sides of staircase

  • - Mark the first/last steps in white in some way for easy recognition

  • - Remove or secure loose rugs

  • - Carpet - more difficult to navigate with walkers, lifts, canes and wheelchairs and wear more but vinyl and tiles can be slippery and harder if a person falls. Low-pile carpet makes it less likely to get feet stuck in.

  • - Consider cleaning bare flooring with non-skid floor wax.

  • - Door widening hinges can widen doors by around 2 inches

  • - Make sure lamps, as well as table lamps are placed so that they cannot be easily tipped over

  • - Objects like floor vases, other objects and side tables are easy to navigate around - where possible remove them or ensure they are placed well out of the way of main walkways

  • - Cover sharp edges of countertops and other sharp surfaces with cushioning

  • - Keep everything that is needed within easy, remove things that are out of reach.

  • - Replace buttons, zips and laces with Velcro

  • Kitchen

  • - Chopping, sautéing and mixing can be difficult - set up ingredients and kitchen tools in a place where you can sit to prepare food

  • - Use plastic mixing bowls to avoid breaks

  • - Extra tea-towels to clean up any spill

Gadgets

  • - Hot Hand® Protector glove

  • - Jar Opener

  • - ULU knife

  • - Battery/electric operated can openers, peelers, scissors

  • - Adaptive handles for toothbrushes, hairbrushes, and combs

  • - Special cups and glasses that make them easier to hang on to.

Bedroom

  • - Lower floors (to avoid stairs)

  • - Rails on side of bed to help with getting in and out

  • - Bed pull-up

  • - Satin sheets or pyjamas - helpful for turning over and sliding into different positions.

Bathroom

  • - Anti-slip/skid socks rather than slippers

  • - Bathroom transfer bench - sit down and swing or pull your legs over the side of bath or shower.

  • - Shower chair or plastic garden chair and grip bars on the walls

  • - Rubber non-slippery bath/shower mats

Later stages of Parkinson's

  • - Paint, tape or label taps red or blue to designate hot and cold

  • - Remove locks on bathroom doors

  • - Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters - shuts off electricity when it detects current going through a person or water.

  • - Parkinson's friendly doorknobs

Minor adaptations to the home of up to £1000 are not means tested and can be obtained from the local council. They can also provide any disability equipment too free of charge. Major adaptations up to £30k are means tested.



Previous conditions covered:

Vascular Dementia

Our carers have experience working with and supporting people living with vascular dementia. They're able to respond and adapt the way they deal with the disease as it progresses. Below is a short guide giving you an overview of vascular dementia. If we can help in any way contact us at 0208 886 0686 or use one of the forms to schedule a callback.

Previous conditions covered:

Outline

Vascular dementia is a form of dementia. It is caused when the flow of blood to the brain is reduced. In the UK currently around 150,000 are living with vascular dementia.

Dementia is a confusing term, it's often confused with Alzheimer's disease and other diseases. Dementia is an umbrella term that describes a set of different symptoms. It is caused when the brain is physically damaged by diseases such as Alzheimer's disease or Vascular dementia. Vascular dementia is one of many types of dementia.

Vascular dementia is progressive which means it usually gets worse over time. It can start at different speeds and it's progression is often step like. 


Symptoms

There are many different symptoms related to vascular dementia such as feeling confused or becoming disorientated. Other symptoms include changes in behaviour and or mood, difficulties with understanding and with concentration. There can also be physical difficulties with mobility such as walking and balance. 

Many people who are living with vascular dementia may also have a mixed dementia and also live with Alzheimer's disease, symptoms can include  difficulties with language and with memory. 

A person living with vascular dementia may find it difficult to carry out everyday tasks and may need a level of home care support or support from family members.  

Care

There isn't currently a cure for vascular dementia and it is progressive although it is possible to slow down and also to live well the disease. Lifestyle choices such as maintaining a healthy weight, eating healthily, stopping smoking, doing exercise, taking medication as recommended by a GP and reducing alcohol consumption can help. Therapies such as physiotherapy, occupational therapy, psychological therapies can also help. 

We are a dementia friendly organisation and we deliver the Alzheimer's Society's free 45 minute long Dementia Friends information session. This session takes a very positive view of dealing with dementia. One of it's key 5 messages is that it is possible to live well with dementia. We also strongly align to one of the key elements of the campaign to change the way people talk about dementia and changing from the use of the term 'dementia sufferer' to 'person living with dementia'. We regularly deliver the free Dementia Friends session and can also deliver it 1:1 to family members or to whole family groups. 

The products, support and activities below are from the guide on dementia, this support is also relevant for people living with vascular dementia.

There are lots of support, activities and therapies that can help a person living with dementia to live well. 

Lots of products exist that can assist in daily life such as anti-spill mugs, user-friendly utensils, talking or written word clocks, pill boxes and user-friendly phones. There are also new technologies incorporating the internet of things which monitor the use and also non-use of doors and electrical appliances. 

Many forms of cognitive therapies exist also that can aid a person's mind and keep them independent and living well. Local services and activities that provide singing and meet-ups providing enjoyment, stimulation and social interaction are often hugely valuable and worth looking into also. 



Previous conditions covered:

Alzheimer's

Our home carers have thousands of hours experience working with and supporting people living with Alzheimer's. Below is our short guide giving you a quick overview of Alzheimer's disease. If we can help contact us at 0208 886 0686 or use one of the forms to schedule a callback.

Previous conditions covered:

 

Outline

Alzheimer's disease is a type of dementia. It's the most common dementia and it's estimated that 850,000 people are affected in the UK.

Alzheimer's is a physical disease which affects the brain and so is known as a neurological disease.  When a person has Alzheimer's, proteins build up in the brain and form plaque. These plaques cause a loss in connection between the nerve cells in the brain. This can cause nerve cells to die. 

There are factors that increase the risk of getting Alzheimer's though as yet the exact cause of the disease is unknown. These factors include severe head injuries, family history of Alzheimer's, age and lifestyle. 

Symptoms

Alzheimer's disease usually begins with difficulties with more recent memory such as forgetting recent conversations, events, names and places. 

Alzheimer's is progressive so difficulties will become worse over time which can lead to confusion, getting lost, difficulty with making decisions, problems with movement, self-care, mood speech, language, personality changes and difficulty judging distances. 

These difficulties will become increasingly severe and the person living with Alzheimer's may need more support from families. Some people with Alzheimer's may develop sleeplessness, aggression, hallucinations, seeing and hearing things that are not there and delusions and believing things that aren't true. 

Alzheimer's disease may eventually lead to difficulties with walking, eating and being aware of their surroundings and will need support with their daily lives.

Care

We are a dementia friendly organisation and we deliver the Alzheimer's Society's free 45 minute long Dementia Friends information session. This session takes a very positive view of dealing with dementia. One of it's key 5 messages is that it is possible to live well with dementia. We also strongly align to one of the key elements of the campaign to change the way people talk about dementia and changing from the use of the term 'dementia sufferer' to 'person living with dementia'. We regularly deliver the free Dementia Friends session and can also deliver it 1:1 to family members or to whole family groups. 

At this time there is currently no cure for Alzheimer's though it is possible to live well with the disease. In the news yesterday (31st January 2018) scientists have developed a blood test that can detect the build-up of toxic proteins linked to Alzheimer's disease. 

There are drugs that can provide some help with memory difficulties and can also help make regular activities such as cooking and shopping easier to manage as well as helping with concentration and motivation. There are other drugs that can help a person living with more severe Alzheimer's disease which can help again with memory, concentration and daily activities and can also ease delusions and challenging behaviours.

The products, support and activities below are from the guide on dementia, this support is also relevant for people living with Alzheimer's disease. 

There are lots of support, activities and therapies that can help a person living with dementia to live well. 

Lots of products exist that can assist in daily life such as anti-spill mugs, user-friendly utensils, talking or written word clocks, pill boxes and user-friendly phones. There are also new technologies incorporating the internet of things which monitor the use and also non-use of doors and electrical appliances. 

Many forms of cognitive therapies exist also that can aid a person's mind and keep them independent and living well. Local services and activities that provide singing and meet-ups providing enjoyment, stimulation and social interaction are often hugely valuable and worth looking into also. 



Previous conditions covered:

Diabetes

Our home carers support people living with diabetes and have the knowledge and skills to prepare healthy and tasty food beneficial for those living with diabetes. Below is our short guide giving you a quick overview of the types of diabetes. Contact us at 0208 886 0686 if we can help or use one of the forms to schedule a callback.

Previous conditions covered:

 

Outline

Diabetes causes the blood sugar level to become high. There are two types of diabetes:

  • Type 1 diabetes

  • Type 2 diabetes

Type 1 diabetes - The immune systems attacks the cells in the body that produce insulin.

Type 2 diabetes - The most common type in the UK. The amount of insulin produced isn't enough or the body stops reacting to insulin.

Insulin is a hormone; produced in the pancreas, it is responsible for regulating blood glucose levels.

Pre-diabetes - This is when people have high blood sugar levels, higher than the normal but not quite at the level of diabetes. 

Symptoms

When your blood glucose levels rise, this can cause you to pass more urine and to feel thirsty and dehydrated. This can then make other illnesses or infections worse.

A hypo also known as Hypoglycaemia can occur when blood glucose levels are less than 4mmols/l (millimoles per litre). Often older people may be at increased risk of a hypo. The symptoms that a hypo is about to happen, that a carer should look out for include: reduced concentration, changes in personality or mood, headaches in the morning or disturbed sleep.

Hypos can cause; confusion, poor appetite, heart attack or stroke, cognitive damage, loss of consciousness, falls, aggressive behaviour and difficulties with speech.

Most of the following symptoms tend to affect the elderly; eye conditions such as glaucoma, cataract and macular degeneration. Reduced eyesight and mobility and as a result problems with the feet and also urinary incontinence.

Care

Hypos should be treated immediately with a cool, non-milky sugary drink or glucose tablets followed by a snack or meal. If the person is unconscious then call for an ambulance.

Blood sugar levels should be monitored and medication should be taken as in accordance to medical advice. 

Diabetes and pre-diabetes can be managed by having a good diet, reduced weight and doing regular exercise. Diabetes can also be controlled by stopping smoking, reducing alcohol consumption, through medication and with regular reviews with medical professionals. 

Diabetes can as a result of many of it's symptoms make self-care tasks difficult and people living with diabetes may need additional help.  



Previous conditions covered:

Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

Our home and live in carers have experience working with and supporting people living with multiple sclerosis. They can accompany you and loved ones to hospital, provide a superb level of care at home or help with errands around the home. Here's our short guide providing you with an overview of multiple sclerosis. If we can help contact us at 0208 886 0686 or use one of the forms to schedule a callback.

Previous conditions covered:

 

Outline

Multiple sclerosis (also known as MS) is a neurological condition, this means it affects the brain, nerves and spinal cord.

Symptoms

There are many different symptoms relating to multiple sclerosis that can occur in many different parts of the body. It's symptoms are sometimes only mild but it often causes severe disability. Most people won't be affected by all of these symptoms. 

A person's vision, speech, swallowing, movement in the arms and legs may be affected as well as difficulties with walking, balance, fatigue (feeling tired), spams, stiffness and bladder problems. Other symptoms of multiple sclerosis can be affects on memory, thinking, emotions and also sexual function. 

Care

Multiple sclerosis can be diagnosed by a neurologist following a visit to a GP. MS is best managed with drugs (as advised by medical professionals) as well as diet, exercise and other therapies.



Previous conditions covered:

Home Care - What is a Local Care Expert?

The best of online with Local Care Experts on your doorstep.


We're online. We have online home carer profiles and the care is tracked online in (near) real-time! It's practically instant! 

However we also offer the personalised home care service that our clients want and love. We come and meet you and your loved ones in person. A Local Care Expert in your area. 

We're hybrid offline-online, similar to Purple Bricks and Yopa. It's far easier to use than the broken agency model and you'll get the personalised service that isn't available with online agencies. 

So how does it work? 

Request a call back with your Local Care Expert who will then schedule a face-to-face consultation. We'll then visit again and introduce you to 1 or 2 carers that will consistently care for your loved ones. 

We already have dedicated Local Care Experts for London and for Haringey.  

We'd love to know what you think, if you have any ideas for us, do send us a message at hello@carechooser.com or pop us over a message on Facebook.  

If you think you'd make a GREAT Local Care Expert, be great at meeting our home care clients face-to-face, listening to their ideas, concerns and expectations and offering them local knowledge on the services and support available in your local area. We'd love to hear from you, get in touch with us at hello@carechooser.com or get in touch here

You'll need to fit into out trusting culture, be genuinely warm and caring and want to make a difference in your local area. 


Home Care Questions - Other Episodes:



Download our brochure below: 

Home Care - How do the carer profiles work?

Our carer profiles can be viewed online before you book, they give you a chance to understand a little more about the carer.

What do the symbols mean? Here we break down our profiles for you. 

We keep our profiles as up-to-date as possible, its worth double checking the status of the carer. Should you be interested in on of our carers there is a button below the profile where you can send a message to the carer.  Our telephone number is also below the profiles, so you can contact our expert care advisors to chat about a carer you are interested in or you can use the call back form and one of advisors will get back to you as soon as possible. Another alternative is the live chat at the bottom of the page, we're pretty responsive on there!! 

What do the carer profile symbols mean? 

These three symbols tell you which type of care the carer specialises in, home care, 24 hour live in care or night care. Some carers may be available for more than one type of care. 

DBS.png

This is the UK government's Disclose and Barring Service logo, formerly known as CRB  (Criminal Record Bureau check). Underneath this we update the status of the check; 'Checked & Approved' or 'Not Yet Checked & Approved' if we are in the process of approving the criminal record check. 

Home care locations.png

This symbol is our location icon. Next to this icon will be the carers' current location, where they are currently living. This is often one of the key, major factors in whether the carer will be a good local match.  

This is our drivers icon! If this icon is present on the home carer's profile then they have both a driver's license and a car. If they have just one of the two; a car or a licence but not the other or neither the icon will be absent from the profile. 

This icon indicates which health conditions the carer has previously worked with and supported, this could be either as a home carer, live in carer, night carer, in a care home setting or on a voluntary basis, some carers also have personal experience caring for family members with certain conditions. If you'd like further information about the carer's history, we're more than happy to provide the information. 

Home Care Qualifications.png

This icon on the profile indicates whether the carer has completed home care or social care training, certification or has completed qualifications. They will be listed below the icon on the profile along with information on the level at which the qualification was obtained such as NVQ, degree level and for Health and Social Care qulaifiactions will detail the level from 1-5. Level 1 is a fairly basic level, level 2 and 3 are both good levels. Level 4 is quite advanced and level is a management level qualification. 

This icon indicates the availability of the home carer. For live in carers this section may indicate when they are available or the length of their live in care shifts. Some carers do 1 week slots, others do 2, 3, 4 or 5 week or more slots. For home care and night care this section may indicate the hours the carer is currently available for. For more information and to check the current status of this please get in touch with our advisors to check. 

Home Care Questions - Other Episodes:


Our 'Building Success Between Customer and Carer' brochure is free below. 



Home Care Questions - Previous Episodes:


Download our brochure below: 

Home Care - How do I make the care a success?

You've heard the horror stories, the care went badly... the carer left... So how do you make care a success?

We've been doing a lot of work around our vision as a company. What we stand for? Why we're doing it? How we're going to meet our vision. We've done some Facebook live videos around our trusting culture recently and we've more to do around this. 

We don't micro-manage our carers, tell them what to do, order them around and force them into anything. We give them a level of control over their own schedules, we build in flexibility and most importantly we trust them. By adding an extra layer of trust, our carers are more positive and proactive.

To give some insight into the social care industry; keeping carers is difficult. Nationally around 48% of carers leave within their 1st year, 36% leave each and every year, around 900 a day. Having worked as a carer prior to founding CareChooser in social care and also as a teacher and behaviour specialist in Special Educational Needs I am aware that carers and other professionals have little or no autonomy; zero control over decision-making and the average pay is £7.69/hour!

So what are we doing about it? 

We pay our carers form 60 to 75% more than the average, we have a trusting culture, we treat them warmly and we have reasonable expectations over time and tasks. Stressed, over-worked carers never last long. It ends up being short-term and a conveyor belt of carers. 

But unfortunately this alone is not enough. 

If care is to work, be positive and long lasting. We need all sides to be fully on board with our trusting culture, which is why this week we've launched our new brochure 'Building Success Between Customer and Carer - Preparing for Care and Success' 

We know this is not for everyone, this may not be for you and that's ok. But it is how we do things at CareChooser and it is a requirement for clients to join us, because it works. Positivity, trust, realistic expectations and taking the time to build a positive, warm relationship will result in the relationship being a long term one and your loved ones care will receive great care.

As I said, I know that this is not for everyone, but if you're considering CareChooser for your loved one then you should join us in our trusting culture and offer a level of flexibility to the carer. You should be reasonable and considerate about time and about tasks. It's often useful to consider the tasks and the amount of time it would take to do that task well. You should greet the carer warmly and create a warm relationship and you should give it a little time, a new placement takes a while to get the hang of for everyone. It'll take a little time for your loved one to adapt to having a new person in the house and it'll take the carer a while to get up to speed with the placement. 

If you'd like to speak with me or have any questions for me, I'm making myself personally available to answer any questions you may have. 

All the best, Christopher - CareChooser Founder

Home Care Questions - Other Episodes:


Our 'Building Success Between Customer and Carer' brochure is free below. 



Home Care Questions - Previous Episodes:

Home Care - What should I look for in a carer?

Home Care Questions - Other Episodes:

If you're thinking about getting home care to help support a loved one or looking at the option of a care home. There are lots of things to consider and think about. What should I look for in a carer?

 

The 1st thing we look for in a carer is whether they fit with our vision, it's really important to us that everyone involved with CareChooser is warm and caring and wants to make a difference to their local community. 

Qualifications

A good level of qualification is Health and Social Care Level 2. You can get higher, level 3 and level 4. Level 5 is for home care management skills. Level 1 is quite basic, level 2 is a good level of qualification. This may or may not be important to you, we find some of the best carers don't have social care qualifications but have experience caring for loved ones and are warm and caring. 

Skills

It's important to look into which skills are important to you as a family. Do you need a driver? Is the carer local enough to not need to drive? The tasks you need may affect this, does your loved one have lots of appointments to go to?

Is cooking an important skill for your carer? Personal care is an important one, check that the carer is willing to do personal care. All carers have their preferences, if personal care is a part of the care it's advisable to check this. 

Price

Check the price of the carer, per hour, per day, per night or week and check it fits within your budget. Also check that the price of the carer includes the home care companies fee and is the full amount you'll fee. The prices on our profiles are include our fee. The prices vary slightly based on the carer's skills and qualifications. 

Likes and dislikes

Get to know the carers likes and dislikes, our home care profiles tell you about the person, what they enjoy doing rather than just the clinical information. 

DBS

Check the status of the carer's DBS certificate. Our profiles will say what stage the check is at 'Checked & Approved' or 'Not Yet Checked & Approved'. Also check that an enhanced DBS check has been done. 

 

At CareChooser the most important factor we consider is whether the carer is warm and caring. Get in touch if we can help you find a carer or if we can help in any way. 

📞 0208 886 0686 

Home Care - What Should I Consider?

Are you feeling like you don't know which questions to ask? Unsure about what to consider and feeling alone and abandoned by care professionals. As part of My Support Network, our network of support for you we've put together a short guide of things to consider if you're in need of some support to help with your loved ones. 

Home Care Questions - Other Episodes:

If you're thinking about getting home care to help support a loved one or looking at the option of a care home. There are lots of things to consider and think about. But what are they? 

Here's our list of questions to consider.

What type of support do I need? What do I need help with in order to support my loved one?

What type of medical or health condition do they have?

What types of things can they remain independent with and do by themselves?

What types of things will they need support with? Emotional support, physical support, what other tasks might they need help with?

Will they need some level of personal care?

How much care will my loved one need? Think about how long each task would take.

What type of care will my loved one need? 2-4 hours of care, full day care, night care, 24 hour live in care.

How much will the care cost? What is my budget? Will I qualify for a direct payment?

How long might they need the care for?

Are there specific things that they may need in a carer? Are there necessary qualifications, certificates or training that need to be considered to meet the need? What skills will the carer need? What would make a good match?

Will we need to prepare our loved one for the care in any way?

Coming up with the answers to these types of questions may help the family make a decision about the requirements for care.  They may also help you get an idea of the carer you are looking for and what would make a great match. 

If you need any help answering any of the questions, we are more than happy to offer help and support in any way we can and you can find a deeper version of this where we've explored the different answers to the questions for you. 

My Support Network is how we support you. We're here to support you, we're always at the end of the phone (if we don't answer immediately it's because we're helping another client) or we can make a short trip to visit you in person. 

Call us on 0208 886 0686 or 07792939454

Or request a callback: